Wildcards

The supported wildcards include:

Wildcards Description

*

Any number of any characters. For example:

Accounting*

  • For search operations, the above wildcard pattern returns search results for any messages or items that match the pattern "Accounting" followed by any number of any characters, found in any of the following fields (where applicable): Subject, From, To, Cc, Bcc, Content, or Attachment; (e.g., Accounting Meeting Minutes, Accounting Manager, Accounting Records, etc.).
  • For filtering operations, the above wildcard pattern filters any mailbox folder name that begins with "Accounting" followed by any number of any characters (e.g., Accounting Mailbox, Accounting Folder, etc.). For more filtering examples using this wildcard character, see the note at the bottom of this page.
  • For auto-discovery operations, the above wildcard pattern auto-discovers any mailbox display name that begins with "Accounting" followed by any number of any characters (e.g., Accounting Mailbox, Accounting Manager, etc.).

?

Any one character. For example:

user_group?

  • For search operations, the above wildcard pattern returns search results for any messages or items that match the pattern beginning with "user_group" followed by any one character, found in any of the following fields (where applicable): Subject, From, To, Cc, Bcc, Content, or Attachment; (e.g., user_groupA, user_group1, etc.).
  • For filtering operations, the above wildcard pattern filters any mailbox folder name that begins with "user_group" followed by any one character (e.g., user_groupA, user_group1, etc.).
  • For auto-discovery operations, the above wildcard pattern auto-discovers any mailbox display name that begins with "user_group" followed by any one character (e.g., user_groupA, user_group1, etc.).

[ ]

Any range of characters. For example:

[JT]im

  • For filtering operations, the above wildcard pattern excludes from data protection operations any mailbox folder name that begins with "J" or "T" and ends with "im" (e.g., Jim, Tim).
  • For auto-discovery operations, the above wildcard pattern auto-discovers any mailbox display name that begins with "J" or "T" and ends with "im" (e.g., Jim, Tim).

[a-k]Lee

  • For filtering operations, the above wildcard pattern excludes from data protection operations any mailbox folder name that begins with any character in the range of "a" through "k" inclusive and that ends with "Lee" (e.g., aLee, bLee, etc.).
  • For auto-discovery operations, the above wildcard pattern auto-discovers any mailbox display name that begins with any character in the range of "a" through "k" inclusive and that ends with "Lee" (e.g., aLee, bLee, etc.).

This wildcard cannot be used for search operations.

Numbers within square brackets are treated as single digits, and a dash between two digits indicates the complete range of numbers between those two digits.

For example,

test[1-5].txt backs up all files test1.txt, test2.txt, test3.txt, test4.txt, and test5.txt.

test1[0-9][0-9][0-9].txt backs up all files starting from test1000.txt to test1999.txt.

To back up files test 10 to test 39, enter test[1-3][0-9]. If you enter [10-39], it would back up test1, test0, test3, and test9.

[! ]

The negation of a range of characters. For example:

[!ei]nsure

  • For filtering operations, the above wildcard pattern excludes from data protection operations any mailbox folder name that ends with "nsure" but does not begin with "e" or "i" (e.g., unsure).
  • For auto-discovery operations, the above wildcard pattern auto-discovers any mailbox display name that ends with "nsure" but does not begin with "e" or "i" (e.g., unsure).

[!a-k]Lee

  • For filtering operations, the above wildcard pattern excludes from data protection operations any mailbox folder name that does not begin with "a" through "k" and that ends with "Lee" (e.g., xLee, yLee, etc.).
  • For auto-discovery operations, the above wildcard pattern auto-discovers any mailbox display name that does not begin with "a" through "k" and that ends with "Lee" (e.g., xLee, yLee, etc.).

This wildcard cannot be used for search operations.

You can also use a combination of wildcards in a single expression, if the wildcards are supported for the type of operation you are performing. For example, if you wanted to auto-discover all mailbox display names beginning with any characters in the range of "A" through "K" inclusive followed by any number of any characters, you would enter the following wildcard combination:

[A-K]*

Keep in mind that the path entered for the subclient filter is based on what level is being filtered out. The examples provided below illustrate this point:

  • To filter out a root folder called "Sent Items", specify the name of the folder and the asterisk "*" wildcard with no delimiters, as shown in the following example:

    Sent*

  • To filter out a subfolder called "test", specify the full path including the leader "\", as shown in the following example:

    Sent Items\test*

  • To filter out any path that ends in a folder name, use the full path including the leader "\" and the asterisk "*" wildcard for the first level, as shown in the following example:

    *\test*

  • To filter all directories that begin with a particular word on all drives (e.g. My_Filter), use the global filter:

*:\**\My_Filter*\**

  • If you know the drive letter to filter, use the subclient filter as follows:

C:\**\My_Filter*\**

  • To filter every directory named "temp" on all drives, use the global filter:

*:\**\temp\**

  • Or use the subclient filter:

C:\**\temp\**

  • To filter every "recycler" directory on all drives, use the global filter:

*:\**\RECYCLER\**

  • Or use the subclient filter:

C:\**\RECYCLER\**

Do not use "temp*" when all you want to filter is temp, as it will get "template" and other directories with word "temp".

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