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Full Virtual Machine

When restoring a full virtual machine, you can restore data to the same destination host and place all disks back to their original datastores; this is an in-place restore.

Virtual machines can also be restored to a different location than where they existed at the time of backup; this is an out-of-place restore. The following options can be used for an out-of-place restore:

  • Different vCenter: An entire virtual machine can be restored to a different vCenter. This feature provides the flexibility to distribute restored virtual machines to a location with greater space and resource availability. This will be useful when the virtual machine's original location does not provide optimal space and resources.
  • Different ESX server: By default, a virtual machine is restored to the ESX server where it was at the time of backup; but you can choose to restore to a different ESX server. Specifying a different location provides the flexibility to distribute restored virtual machines to a location with greater space and resource availability.
  • Different datastore: You can specify a different datastore on the destination host. After the restore, the virtual machine is automatically associated to the new datastore.
  • Different Resource Pool or vApp: By default, a virtual machine is restored to its original resource pool; but you can select a specific resource pool or vApp on the host. vApp is a customized form of a resource pool.
  • Different VM name: By default, a virtual machine is restored with the original name used at the time of backup; but you can change the name when the VM is restored.
  • Restore to a VM folder: Select a destination folder on the datacenter.
  • Restore with different network adapter: Select a network adapter that is available for the destination.

For backups performed in Service Pack 10 or later, full VM restores to the same vCenter can include vCenter tags and VM storage policies associated with the source VM.

For required permissions, see Permissions for Custom User Accounts.

If virtual machine disks (VMDKs) were created at the root level in vCenter, backed up, and restored, those disks will be restored with the associated virtual machine in a folder using the name of the virtual machine.

When restoring a VMware virtual machine from disk backup in SAN environments, restore directly to an ESX server rather than to the vCenter. Otherwise SAN transport mode may be slower than NBD transport mode, with events in the VMware client GUI displaying "clear lazy zero.".

Last modified: 1/14/2019 10:52:22 PM